​© 2011-2022, Teri F. Belmont, Ph.D., PLLC.   All rights reserved. 

Practice Information

​▪  My  Notice of Psychologists’ Policies and Practices to Protect the Privacy of Your Health Information  (HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices document; Nevada)​


​▪  Please be aware that Nevada law (subsection 7 of NRS 629.051) requires that I notify you that:
    - The health care records of a person who is less than 23 years may not be destroyed.
    - The health care records of a person who has attained the age of 23 may be destroyed if they have been retained for at least 5 years
       or a longer period as provided by federal law.

    - The health care records of a patient who is 23 years of age or older may be destroyed after 5 years, except as otherwise provided in subsection 7 of NRS 629.051 and unless

       a longer period is provided by federal law.  

▪  Federal HIPAA law also dictates that I retain this documentation for six (6) years from the date of its creation or the date when it last was in effect, whichever is later.


▪  My  
Notice of Psychologists’ Policies and Practices to Protect the Privacy of Your Health Information  (HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices document; Iowa)​

▪  Iowa Code 645 – 243.8(154B) requires that I retain clinical records and psychotherapy notes for at least seven (7) years after the last date of service, or at least three (3) years 

    after a minor reaches the age of 18, whichever is later.  Forensic records shall be completed and retained consistent with the APA Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology. 
▪  Federal HIPAA law also dictates that I retain this documentation for six (6) years from the date of its creation or the date when it last was in effect, whichever is later.



​Access the most current (2022) versions of my:


Curriculum Vitae  ▪  Assisted Reproduction (ART) Fee Schedule  ▪  ​Forensic Fee Schedule




You have the right to receive a “Good Faith Estimate” explaining how much your health care will cost.


Under Federal law (the No Surprises Act), health care providers need to give patients who don’t have insurance or who are not using insurance

an estimate of the bill for health care items and services.


     ▪  You have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of any non-emergency items or services.  This includes related costs like tests,

         prescription drugs, equipment, and hospital fees.
     ▪  Make sure your health care provider gives you a Good Faith Estimate in writing at least 1 business day before your health care service or item.  You can also ask your

         health care provider, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule an item or service.
     ▪  If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill.
     ▪  Keep a copy of your Good Faith Estimate in a safe place or take pictures of it.  You may need it if you are billed more than $400 than the estimate provided.

For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visitwww.cms.gov/nosurprisesor call CMS at 1-800-985-3059.





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